Category Archives: In Media

Speakers rue lack of media role in education

Publication: The Nation
Date:  May 9, 2014
Web Address:-   http://www.nation.com.pk/national/13-May-2014/speakers-rue-lack-of-media-role-in-education

BAHAWALPUR-Low enrollment rate, poor quality, lack of accountability and absence of discourse are the key problems being faced by the education sector of Pakistan and the same could not be solved without the active participation of all the segments of society especially the media, according to the consensus made at a workshop held on education and journalism here on Saturday.

“A survey report has revealed that 24 percent children between 5 16 years of age in Bahawalpur have no access to schools. The survey was launched by the Annual Status of Education Report. There is dire need for improving the accountability, media coverage of the educational issues and consensus on provincial-level educational policies by engaging the media, legislators and educationists,” the workshop participants said.

Bahawalpur Press Club President Shahid Akhtar while sharing his views about the major problems in the sector in Southern Punjab said that the most effective way to achieve development and long-term improvement in the health sector was to educate the females. “Through the powerful voice of media, journalists should carry out accountability of legislators, policy-makers and educationists for the betterment of the education sector,” he added.

Department of Media Studies at Islamia University of Bahawalpur Chairman Dr Ghulam Shabbir Baloch spoke on the role of media in the current state of education in Pakistan. He said that media was a key factor for the policy development. He said that Pakistan was faced with the emergency situation in the education sector but due coverage was not being given by the electronics and print media.

Journalist Mubashar Zaidi said that the education was one of the most neglected sectors by the media. “Most of the issues related to education and literacy are being reported in irrelevant context; this undermines and diminishes the importance of the educational, training and child development challenges,” he added.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media

Publication: PKAFFARIS.COM
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address
; http://www.affairs.com.pk/News_Education-journalism-Why-education-is-neglected-in-the-media_44259

Education is one of the most neglected sectors in media, as journalists often consider it boring to report on the subject”, said former education minister Mian Imran Masood at a journalism workshop on Tuesday.
The Ilm-o-Agahi one-day workshop was organized by an NGO and a partner institute of the Centre for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (a three year UK-Aid funded programme). It was a part of an 18-journalism-workshop-series that will be held across Pakistan for education reporters.
Masood said that a lack of authentic information and competing interest of stake holders made it difficult for reporters to follow up on education related policies and issues. He said this also effected investigation of budget allocations.
“Ilm-o-Agahi’s objective is to encourage journalists to create narratives that enable equal access to education,” Programme Manager Asif Farooqui said. He said they hoped to analyse policy reforms in the education sector to ensure that it is strengthened.
There are also plans to introduce special categories for education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism Agahi Awards 2014.
Journalist Mubashir Zaidi said the media should play an active role in promoting education for marginalized segments of society. He said this would help eliminate economic disparity. He added that the media needed to sensitise people about the need for quality education through reporting and highlighting various issues in the sector.
Saad Hamid, a social media expert, said journalism had seen a paradigm shift with the advent of social media. He said this was especially significant for citizen journalism, where ordinary people could be involved in spreading news through social media forums. He said social media had extended the reach of a journalist globally.
He also stressed its role in ‘digital storytelling’. “Gathering news, verifying and publishing has seen a revolutionary change. Social media has taken transparency to higher levels,” he claimed.
Huma Zia, a research and policy analyst at Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed the Annual Status of Education Report’s findings with journalists during the session. She said according to report 16 per cent of children between the ages of five and 16 had no access to school.
She added that 34 per cent of children enrolled in Class 5 could not read a Class 2 story in Urdu, and 38 per cent of Class 5 children could not read English stories. She said that for sustainable growth, the government needed to shift its focus from ‘access’ to access and learning

Speakers urge media to lay emphasis on education sector

Publication: Daily Business Recorder
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address
; http://www.brecorder.com/general-news/172/1168714/

“Pakistan today needs more emphasis on education sector and media should also follow suit. Education sector is one of the most neglecting areas in reporting in media. Journalists often find it boring to report or securitize the education sector. Lack of stakeholder’s interest and commitment to the education sector makes it different for reporters to do follow up on education policy or scrutinise education budget allocation. This was stated by Ex. Minister for Education, Punjab, Mian Imran Masood, at the ILM-o-AGAHI education journalism workshop held in Lahore, today.

The ILM-o-AGAHI, one day workshop was organised by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (3 year UK aid funded program). More than thirty education reporters from all leading media entities, from print, television, radio and online journalism, were selected for the workshop.

Award winning senior journalist, Mubashir Zaidi said that Pakistan’s media should play an active role inpromoting education for the marginalized segments of the society as it can help to eliminate economic disparity through the introduction of quality education. “New entrants in the field of journalism should therefore strive to sensitise the people on the importance of education, as education is the key to success for progress” he added.

Asif Farooqui, Program Manager, ILM-o-AGAHI, while discussing the salient features of the initiative said that a learning platform for journalists on education would be developed as a ready reference for journalists working on education related issues. “The objective of ILM-o-AGAHI initiative is to encourage journalists to create narratives which enable equal access to education for all while analysing the policy reforms within the education sector and aimed to strengthen institutions” he added.

He further said “Mishal is also introducing special categories on education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism “AGAHI Awards 2014″ to promote education journalism in Pakistan.”

Saad Hamid, social media expert, spoke on the art of story-telling through social media. He said in the age of social media, journalism has seen a paradigm shift with the advent of citizen journalism where everyone is in some way involved in spreading news around. Social Media has broken all social and cultural barriers and has extended the reach of a journalist globally. The role of social media in digital storytelling is crucial. Finding a news, verifying it and publishing has seen a revolutionary change and has helped take transparency to better levels.

Huma Zia, Research and Policy Analyst, Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed Annual Status of Education Report’s findings on education with the Journalists during the session. She said according to the Annual Status of Education Report – ASER 2013 National Survey that 16 % children have no access to school between the ages of 5-16 years.

Annual Status of Education Report (ASER) is a household based citizen led large scale assessment seeking evidence on learning and access. According to the Punjab findings 34 % children enrolled in class 5 cannot read a class 2 story in Urdu, 38% class 5 children cannot read English stories and 44% cannot do 2 digit division. “The government needs to shift its focus from ‘access’ to ‘access plus learning’ for sustainable growth” she added.

Through the ILM-o-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops will be held across Pakistan for education reporters to increase their capacity and improve the coverage on education issues in media. In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters will be selected to enhance their capacity to report on identified educational challenges and issues to improve understanding and skills among journalists to capture community’s perspective and voice including children’s voice.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media

Publication: Pakistan Times
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address:
http://pktimes.4com.co/2014/04/02/education-journalism-why-education-is-neglected-in-the-media/

LAHORE:
“Education is one of the most neglected sectors in media, as journalists often consider it boring to report on the subject”, said former education minister Mian Imran Masood at a journalism workshop on Tuesday.

The Ilm-o-Agahi one-day workshop was organized by an NGO and a partner institute of the Centre for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (a three year UK-Aid funded programme). It was a part of an 18-journalism-workshop-series that will be held across Pakistan for education reporters.

Masood said that a lack of authentic information and competing interest of stake holders made it difficult for reporters to follow up on education related policies and issues. He said this also effected investigation of budget allocations.

“Ilm-o-Agahi’s objective is to encourage journalists to create narratives that enable equal access to education,” Programme Manager Asif Farooqui said.  He said they hoped to analyse policy reforms in the education sector to ensure that it is strengthened.

There are also plans to introduce special categories for education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism Agahi Awards 2014.

Journalist Mubashir Zaidi said the media should play an active role in promoting education for marginalized segments of society. He said this would help eliminate economic disparity. He added that the media needed to sensitise people about the need for quality education through reporting and highlighting various issues in the sector.

Saad Hamid, a social media expert, said journalism had seen a paradigm shift with the advent of social media. He said this was especially significant for citizen journalism, where ordinary people could be involved in spreading news through social media forums. He said social media had extended the reach of a journalist globally.

He also stressed its role in ‘digital storytelling’. “Gathering news, verifying and publishing has seen a revolutionary change. Social media has taken transparency to higher levels,” he claimed.

Huma Zia, a research and policy analyst at Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed the Annual Status of Education Report’s findings with journalists during the session. She said according to report 16 per cent of children between the ages of five and 16 had no access to school.

She added that 34 per cent of children enrolled in Class 5 could not read a Class 2 story in Urdu, and 38 per cent of Class 5 children could not read English stories. She said that for sustainable growth, the government needed to shift its focus from ‘access’ to access and learning.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 2nd, 2014.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media

AHORE: 

“Education is one of the most neglected sectors in media, as journalists often consider it boring to report on the subject”, said former education minister Mian Imran Masood at a journalism workshop on Tuesday.

Publication: The Express Tribune
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address:
http://tribune.com.pk/story/690170/education-journalism-why-education-is-neglected-in-the-media/

The Ilm-o-Agahi one-day workshop was organized by an NGO and a partner institute of the Centre for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Ilm Ideas (a three year UK-Aid funded programme). It was a part of an 18-journalism-workshop-series that will be held across Pakistan for education reporters.

Masood said that a lack of authentic information and competing interest of stake holders made it difficult for reporters to follow up on education related policies and issues. He said this also effected investigation of budget allocations.

“Ilm-o-Agahi’s objective is to encourage journalists to create narratives that enable equal access to education,” Programme Manager Asif Farooqui said.  He said they hoped to analyse policy reforms in the education sector to ensure that it is strengthened.

There are also plans to introduce special categories for education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism Agahi Awards 2014.

Journalist Mubashir Zaidi said the media should play an active role in promoting education for marginalized segments of society. He said this would help eliminate economic disparity. He added that the media needed to sensitise people about the need for quality education through reporting and highlighting various issues in the sector.

Saad Hamid, a social media expert, said journalism had seen a paradigm shift with the advent of social media. He said this was especially significant for citizen journalism, where ordinary people could be involved in spreading news through social media forums. He said social media had extended the reach of a journalist globally.

He also stressed its role in ‘digital storytelling’. “Gathering news, verifying and publishing has seen a revolutionary change. Social media has taken transparency to higher levels,” he claimed.

Huma Zia, a research and policy analyst at Idara-e-Taleem-o-Agahi, discussed the Annual Status of Education Report’s findings with journalists during the session. She said according to report 16 per cent of children between the ages of five and 16 had no access to school.

She added that 34 per cent of children enrolled in Class 5 could not read a Class 2 story in Urdu, and 38 per cent of Class 5 children could not read English stories. She said that for sustainable growth, the government needed to shift its focus from ‘access’ to access and learning.

Published in The Express Tribune, April 2nd, 2014.

Education journalism: Why education is neglected in the media

Statesman
Date:  April 2, 2014
Web Address:
http://statesman.com.pk/index.php?edition=peshawar&date=2014-03-27&page=3&type=newspaper

PESHAWAR: “Education is the only key to reduce terrorism in the country.

The future of Pakistan depends on the immediate education reforms and conflict in Dera Ismail Khan recede journalists freedom It’s time to take effective steps for making our educational system better, and it can be done only if all the stake holders including government, academia, media and civil society should focus on education.”

This was the consensus at the ILM-o-AGAHI education journalism workshop held for journalists of Dera Ismail Khan, on Wednesday.

The ILM-o-AGAHI, one day workshop was organized by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with I lm Ideas (a 3 year UK aid funded programme).

More than thirty education reporters of Dera Ismail Khan (Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) from all leading media entities, from print, television, radio and online journalism, were selected for the workshop.

Prof. Dr. Zafar Iqbal, Chairman of Media Sciences, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, urged upon that to make education as their top priority of reporting.

It is important to report on terrorism and insurgency in KP, but to fight it off and report terrorism from their areas, promotion of education is the great significance.

The journalists have the great responsibility to report on education issues of their areas.

It is more like investigating issue of education as hardly education itself generates news.

Asif Farooqui, Program Manager, ILM-o-AGAHI, while discussing the salient features of the initiative said that, a learning platform for journalists on education would be developed as a ready reference for journalists working on education related issues.

He further said, “Mishal is also introducing special categories on education journalism in the upcoming annual journalism “AGAHI Awards 2014″ to promote education journalism in Pakistan.”

Haroon ur Rasheed, ASER’s Pakistan representative, discussed ASER’s findings on education with the Journalists during the session.

He said according to the Annual Status of Education Report – ASER 2013 National Survey, that 12.7 % children have no access to school between the age of 5-16 years.

“Dera Ismail Khan is considered one of the worst areas in terms of the enrolment levels standing at 87.3% enrolment for 6-16 year old children and 12.7% children currently are out of school.

Gender gaps do exist in the FATA, ratio of boys and girls in both government and private schools are 70% & 30% and 59% & 41% respectively.”

Through the ILM-o-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops will be held across Pakistan for education reporters to increase their capacity and improve the coverage on education issues in media.

In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters will be selected to enhance their capacity to report on identified educational challenges and issues to improve understanding and skills among journalists to capture community’s perspective and voice including children’s voice.

Mishal Pakistan is the partner institute of the Center for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum. Mishal assists the forum in creating soft-data on Pakistan, identifying Pakistan’s competitiveness challenges including primary health & education and higher education.

Every 7th school in Sindh is non-Functional

Publication:  SIndh Studies
Date: 10-04-2014
Weblink:- http://sindhstudy.com/edu-news/2014/02/every-7th-school-sindh-non-functional

Karachi:10 April:The education sector is one of the most neglected areas in Sindh, where ghost schools are the most crucial issue, with every seventh school being non-functional.
This was the consensus at an ILM-o-AGAHI education journalism workshop held here on Wednesday, said a press releaseissued by Mishal Pakistan.
According to a recent survey conducted on the directive of the Supreme Court, there are 6,164 non-functional and ghost schools in Sindh, which means every seventh school in the province is non-functional. “There is a dire need to address the education emergency in Sindh, as the future of the next generations depends on the quality of education,” said one of the speakers, who included journalists, academicians and civil society activists.
The workshop was organised by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas, a three-year UKaid-funded programme.
More than 30 education reporters from leading media entities of print, television, radio and online journalism were selected for the workshop.
According to the Alif Ailaan education data, there are 12 million children in Sindh between the ages of 5 and 16, of which 6.1 million or 50 percent are out of school. More than half of the children out of school are girls.

Senior journalist Mubashir Zaidi, while discussing the current state of education and the role of the media, said the government of Sindh spent an estimated Rs573 million on schools that existed only on paper.

The scope of the problem of ghost teachers was crucial as there was no data available on that; however, media reports suggested that many teachers drew salaries from the education department without showing up for their jobs, he said.

“The education sector is the most neglected area in media; however, with the help of civil society, the media should play an active role in promoting education.”

Discussing the role of the media in policy development, Dr Tahir Masood, chairman of the Department of Mass Communication, University of Karachi, said learning outcome of children was also a big issue and required the attention of education policymakers.

Sindh’s children scored poorly in reading and mathematics compared to children in the rest of the country, he said.

“Fifty-nine percent of class 5 students in Sindh cannot read a story fluently in Urdu or Sindhi.”

Talking on the role of media in a society’s evolution, senior journalist and media researcher Afia Salam said: “Education plays a significant role in the development of a society. Due to advancement in the education sector, developed countries make progress by leaps and bounds in all segments of life. Pakistan’s media can play an active role in creating a demand for quality education in the country.”

Asif Farooqui, programme manager of ILM-o-AGAHI, said: “Education spending in Sindh is not rationalised and resources are not allocated according to the needs. Across Sindh, 77 percent of government school buildings are in an unsatisfactory condition, almost half of the government schools in Sindh are missing the basic facility of toilet.”

Adnan Farooqui, senior communication expert, shared his experiences on the art of story-telling through social media. He briefed the participants about how social media was changing trends of journalism across the globe, and how digital communication had made the entire news expression in 145 words possible.

Through the ILM-o-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops will be held across Pakistan for education reporters to increase their capacity and improve the coverage of education issues in media.
In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters will be selected to enhance their capacity to report on identified educational challenges and issues to improve understanding and skills among journalists to capture the community’s perspective and voice including children’s voice.
Mishal Pakistan is the partner institute of the Center for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum.The news.

Every 7th school in Sindh is non-functional’ ILM-o-AGAHI education journalism workshop

Publication:  Pakedu.net
Date: 10-04-2014
Weblink:- http://pakedu.net/pakistani-education-news/every-7th-school-in-sindh-is-non-functional-ilm-o-agahi-education-journalism-workshop/

 

Speakers at workshop say Sindh is facing an education emergency­ Karachi The education sector is one of the most neglected areas in Sindh, where ghost schools are the most crucial issue, with every seventh school being non-functional.

This was the consensus at an ILM-o-AGAHI education journalism workshop held here on Wednesday, said a press release issued by Mishal Pakistan.

According to a recent survey conducted on the directive of the Supreme Court, there are 6,164 non-functional and ghost schools in Sindh, which means every seventh school in the province is non-functional. “There is a dire need to address the education emergency in Sindh, as the future of the next generations depends on the quality of education,” said one of the speakers, who included journalists, academicians and civil society activists.

The workshop was organised by Mishal Pakistan in collaboration with Ilm Ideas, a three-year UKaid-funded programme.

More than 30 education reporters from leading media entities of print, television, radio and online journalism were selected for the workshop.

According to the Alif Ailaan education data, there are 12 million children in Sindh between the ages of 5 and 16, of which 6.1 million or 50 percent are out of school. More than half of the children out of school are girls.

Senior journalist Mubashir Zaidi, while discussing the current state of education and the role of the media, said the government of Sindh spent an estimated Rs573 million on schools that existed only on paper.

The scope of the problem of ghost teachers was crucial as there was no data available on that; however,media reports suggested that many teachers drew salaries from the education department without showing up for their jobs, he said.

“The education sector is the most neglected area in media; however, with the help of civil society, the media should play an active role in promoting education.”

Discussing the role of the media in policy development, Dr Tahir Masood, chairman of the Department of Mass Communication, University of Karachi, said learning outcome of children was also a big issue and required the attention of education policymakers.

Sindh’s children scored poorly in reading and mathematics compared to children in the rest of the country, he said.

“Fifty-nine percent of class 5 students in Sindh cannot read a story fluently in Urdu or Sindhi.”

Talking on the role of media in a society’s evolution, senior journalist and media researcher Afia Salam said: “Education plays a significant role in the development of a society. Due to advancement in the education sector, developed countries make progress by leaps and bounds in all segments of life. Pakistan’s media can play an active role in creating a demand for quality education in the country.”

Asif Farooqui, programme manager of ILM-o-AGAHI, said: “Education spending in Sindh is not rationalised and resources are not allocated according to the needs. Across Sindh, 77 percent of government school buildings are in an unsatisfactory condition, almost half of the government schools in Sindh are missing the basic facility of toilet.”

Adnan Farooqui, senior communication expert, shared his experiences on the art of story-telling through social media. He briefed the participants about how social media was changing trends of journalism across the globe, and how digital communication had made the entire news expression in 145 words possible.

Through the ILM-o-AGAHI initiative, 18 education journalism workshops will be held across Pakistan for education reporters to increase their capacity and improve the coverage of education issues in media.

In each workshop, more than 30 education reporters will be selected to enhance their capacity to report on identified educational challenges and issues to improve understanding and skills among journalists to capture the community’s perspective and voice including children’s voice.

Mishal Pakistan is the partner institute of the Center for International Media Ethics and the Global Competitiveness and Benchmarking Networks of the World Economic Forum.